Beyond Binary: What the Vampire Squid from Hell Can Teach Us About Access and Ethics in the Digital Humanities

Beyond Binary: What the Vampire Squid from Hell Can Teach Us About Access and Ethics in the Digital Humanities

The following talk/workshop was presented at the Digital Humanities Summer Faculty Workshop at Northwestern University on Tuesday, September 7, 2016.    Introduction As a librarian who has spent the last several years working in both scholarly communication and digital humanities, I’ve become interested in how we create and disseminate culture and knowledge, and the tools Continue reading Beyond Binary: What the Vampire Squid from Hell Can Teach Us About Access and Ethics in the Digital Humanities

Me, My Shelf and I

Me, My Shelf and I

In a little nook off the hallway of Josh Honn’s Ravenswood apartment is Pam’s bookcase. “She kept a black box here full of index cards for every book she read,” he says, referring to his wife, a teacher, who died of metastatic breast cancer in November 2015. “They’re notes on how she acquired the books, and when, Continue reading Me, My Shelf and I

A Slow Archive

A Slow Archive

A Slow Archive by Josh Honn is a deeply personal work of grief before loss, or what the Portuguese call saudade, a three-part poem-diary: an exploration and expression of the role of the lover and care worker in the dying process; an attempt to orient past, present, and future selves amidst encounters with sickness, grief, Continue reading A Slow Archive

An Introduction to Multimodal Scholarship

An Introduction to Multimodal Scholarship

In the summer of 2014, I participated in the second annual Digital Humanities Summer Faculty Workshop at Northwestern University and sponsored by the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations. For two weeks, with amazing colleagues from Northwestern University Library and the Multimedia Learning Center, I worked closely with faculty on developing digital humanities teaching and research projects, Continue reading An Introduction to Multimodal Scholarship

Vilém Flusser and the Abysmal Privilege of Our Platforms

Vilém Flusser and the Abysmal Privilege of Our Platforms

The following short talk—an initial thinking-through and provocation from my recent reading—was presented at HASTAC 2014 in Lima, Peru, as part of the “Political Platforms: Software, Social Justice, and Designing for Change” panel, which included Beatrice Choi, Anne Cong-Huyen, Amanda Philips, and Tara McPherson (discussant).

Visualizing Elision (A Teaching Exercise)

Visualizing Elision (A Teaching Exercise)

Yesterday afternoon I co-taught a class with my friend and colleague Jillana Enteen, Senior Lecturer in Gender & Sexuality Studies. I’ve not done much teaching in my 34+ years, but working with faculty to conceive and construct courses—from syllabus development to assignment creation—is one of the parts of my job I’ve increasingly come to greatly Continue reading Visualizing Elision (A Teaching Exercise)

Never Neutral: Critical Approaches to Digital Tools & Culture in the Humanities

Never Neutral: Critical Approaches to Digital Tools & Culture in the Humanities

“But technology is never neutral and I’m starting to see pause and critique as part of my charge, too.” This opening quote is from Robin Camille Davis, Emerging Technologies & Distance Services Librarian at John Jay College of Criminal Justice at CUNY. An “Emerging Technologies Librarian” is one of several digital librarian positions that have Continue reading Never Neutral: Critical Approaches to Digital Tools & Culture in the Humanities

Coming to consciousness : Eugene Debs, American Socialism and the “Negro Question”

Coming to consciousness : Eugene Debs, American Socialism and the “Negro Question”

During the years of 1897 to 1926, labor activist Eugene V. Debs was America’s most popular socialist leader, an influential figure in the workers’ movement and many presidential elections. Yet, Debs and incipient American socialism have received only cursory treatment in histories of the early 20th century. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Continue reading Coming to consciousness : Eugene Debs, American Socialism and the “Negro Question”